Answer ( 1 )

  1. You eat uranium all the time because it’s common in many soils used to raise crops and feed our livestock. Typical human intake per day is 0.9 to 1.5 micrograms per day, of which only about 0.1 to 6% gets into the bloodstream and settles in the body.

    Uranium tends to concentrate in the bones (66% of absorbed uranium), where it resides for an average of 200 days. Uranium that doesn’t settle in bones is excreted from the body in 1–2 weeks. Humans have lived with these levels of uranium for hundreds of thousands of years.

    It’s hard to pin down health effects of uranium in large quantities. As a chemical poison (like lead), large amounts of uranium are most prone to damaging the kidneys. Soldiers with uranium fragments in them from weapons haven’t exhibited consistent health issues – you don’t want chunks of uranium in your body, but there’s no specific “uranium poisoning” symptoms, unlike lead poisoning.

    Note that you get larger radiation doses from radon (inhaled), carbon-14 (ingested), and potassium-40 (ingested) than uranium.

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