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  1. Ah, but to get hold of the original…

    It is available commercially, and this is, in fact, the Colonel original recipe,but I’m getting ahead of myself.

    Unless you are in your fifties or older, you haven’t had the original.

    Here’s where we pick up the story:

    A woman wrote to the Chicago Tribune:

    “I’m tired of trying various recipes that, so far, have all been a disappointment. The real, real thing is available for sale; it is called “Chicken Seasoning 99 X” from Marion-Kay Spices, so I’m just going to buy some of that. It’s expensive, $30 plus $10 shipping, but you get 25 oz., (enough to fry ~100 lbs. of chicken according to them) and none of it is dirt-cheap salt (you buy the salt separately). $1.60/oz. isn’t all that bad for spices, especially considering that little less-than-one-ounce containers of spices at the grocery store are sometimes 4 or 5 dollars”.

    The story behind it is:

    After Col. Sanders sold KFC, he wasn’t happy with what they did to his original recipe chicken. He had Marion-Kay Spices mix up his original recipe, and then he started recommending to franchise owners that they use the Marion-Kay Spice mix instead of the KFC corporate spice mix.

    Quite a few of the franchise owners did; about 200 of them during the ’60s and ’70s, until KFC corporate sued Marion-Kay Spices in the early ’80s, just after Col. Sanders died, thus blocking them from selling their spice mix to KFC franchises.

    The suppositive “real recipe” is this:

    2 cups all-purpose flour

    2/3 tablespoon salt

    1/2 tablespoon dried thyme leaves

    1/2 tablespoon dried basil leaves

    1/3 tablespoon dried oregano leaves

    1 tablespoon celery salt

    1 tablespoon ground black pepper

    1 tablespoon dried mustard

    4 tablespoons paprika

    2 tablespoons garlic salt

    1 tablespoon ground ginger

    3 tablespoons ground white pepper

    _______________________________________________________________________________

    I do remember from an interview with Colonel Sanders and he was asked regarding the 11 herbs and spices and his only clue was he could go into any lady’s kitchen and find what he needed in her cupboard.

    I know the Marion-Kay Spice mix is correct and it is a considerable amount of product. The above recipe sounds genuine enough but was discredited in the Tribune article I reference. I had thought of buying the Marion Kay mixture and make holiday gifts out of them at the end of the year.

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