Answer ( 1 )

  1. The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing should be the first resort, but for the sake of using it somewhere, here’s an old, old biography I started to compile once.

    Adams, Alison. “Construction of Gender in the History of Artificial Intelligence.” AHC 18, 3 (Fall, 1996): 47-53.

    Ashworth, Thomas J. “Memory, Efficiency, and Symbolic Analysis: Charles Babbage, John Herschel, and the Industrial Revolution.” Isis 57 (Dec 96): 629-653.

    Bowles, Mark D., “U.S. Technological Enthusiasm and British Technological Skepticism in the Age of the Analog Brain.” AHC 18 (December 1996): 5-13.

    Brooks, John. Telephone: The First Hundred Years. New York: Harper and Row, 1976.

    Button, Graham, Jeff Coulter, John R. E. Lee, and Wes Sharrock. Computers, Minds, and Conduct. Cambridge, U.K., and Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell for Polity Press, 1995.

    Campbell-Kelly, Martin. I. C. L.: A Business and Technical History. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989.

    _______. “Programming the Mark I: Early Programming Activity at the University of Manchester.” AHC 2, 2 (April, 1980): 130-168.

    Cortada, James W. Before the Computer: IBM, NCR, Burroughs, and Remington-Rand and the Industry They Created, 1865-1956. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1993.

    _______. A Bibliographic Guide to the History of Computing, Computers, and the Information Processing Industry. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1990.

    _______. The Computer in the United States: From Laboratory to the Market, 1930-1960. Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharp, 1993.

    _______. Second Bibliographic Guide to the History of Computing, Computers, and the Information Processing Industry. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1996.

    Cutliffe, Stephen H. The Machine in the University: Sample Course Sylabi for the History of Technology and Technology Studies. Bethlehem, Penn.: Science, Technology, and Society, 1983.

    Eco, Umberto. The Search for the Perfect Language. Oxford: Blackwell, 1995.

    Edwards, Paul N. The Closed World: Computers and the Politics of Discourse in Cold War America. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1996.

    Fischer, Franklin M., James W. McKie, and Richard B. Mancke. IBM and the U.S. Data-Processing Industry: An Economic History. New York: Praeger Scientific, 1983.

    Galison, Peter. “The Ontology of the Enemy: Norbert Wiener and the Cybernetic Vision.” Critical Inquiry 21 (1994): 228-266.

    Goldstine, Herman. The Computer From Pascal to von Neumann. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1972.

    Good, I. J. “Early Work on Computers at Bletchley.” AHC 1 (1979): 38-48.

    Grattan-Guiness, I. The Fontana History of the Mathematical Sciences. London: Fontana, 1997.

    _______. “Work for the Hairdressers: The Production of de Prony’s Logarithmic and Trigonometric Tables.” AHC 12, 3 (1990): 177-185.

    Graubard, Stephen R. The Artificial Intelligence Debate: False Starts, Real Foundations. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1995.

    Hendry, John. Innovating For Failure: Government Policy and the Early British Computer Industry. Cambridge, Mass., London: MIT Press, 1989.

    Holzmann, Gerald J., and Björn Pehrson. The Early History of Data Networks. Los Alamitos, Calif.: IEEE Computer Society Press, 1995. (Despite the title a history of nineteenth century optical and aerial telegraphy systems.)

    Horgan, John. The End of Science: Facing the Limits of Knowledge in the Twilight of the Scientific Age. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1996.

    Latour, Bruno. Laboratory Life….

    Lee, J. A. N. “The Rise and Fall of the General Electric Corporation Computer Department.” AHC 17, 4 (1995): 24-45.

    Grattan-Guiness, I. The Fontana History of the Mathematical Sciences. London: Fontana, 1997. Lindgren, Michael. Glory and Failure: The Difference Engines of Johann Müller, Charles Babbage, and Edvard Scheutz. Trans. Cambridge, Mass., London: MIT Press, 1990.

    Mackenzie, Donald. “The Automation of Proof: A Historical and Sociological Explanation.” AHC 17, 3 (1995): 6-18.

    Metropolis, N., J. Howlett, Gian-Carlo Rota, eds. A History of Computing in the Twentieth Century. Los Alamos, N.M.: Proceedings of the International Conference on the History of Computing, 1978; New York: Academic Press, 1980.

    _______, and J. Worlton. “A Trilogy of Errors in the History of Computing.” AHC 2,1 (1980): 49-59.

    O’Neill, Judy E. “‘Prestige Luster’ and ‘Snow-Balling Effects:’ IBM’s Development of Computer Time-Sharing.” AHC 17, 2 (1995): 50-54.

    Noble, David F. Forces of Production: A Social History of Industrial Automation. New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984.

    Penrose, Roger. The Emperor’s New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989; reprinted London: Vintage, 1990.

    Polachek, Harry. “Before the Eniac.” AHC 19 (April-June 1997): 25-30.

    Pugh, Emerson W. Building IBM: Shaping the Industry and its Technology. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1996.

    Reynolds, Tony S. The Machine in the University: Sample Course Syllabi for the History of Technology and Technology Studies. 2nd Ed. Bethlehem, Penns.: Science, Technology, and Society, 1987.

    Sammet, Jean. A History of Programming Languages.

    Stout, Thomas M., and Theodore J. Williams, “Pioneering Work in the Field of Computer Process Control.” AHC 17, 1 (1995): 6-18.

    Turing, Alan. “Computing Machinery and Intelligence.” Mind 59, no. 236 (1950).

    Young, Jeffrey. Steve Jobs: The Journey is the Reward. London, 1988.

    Winterbotham, J. M. The Hut Six Story. (1980).

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