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  1. On the shoreline of the Beirut sea there are thirty wedding dresses. They are decked with intricate lace and frills. Each hangs from a noose.

    They sway with the wind leaving the morbid feeling of lost hope.

    They were one part of a protest that began in 2015.

    For decades, Lebanese law refused to hold rapists accountable.

    There are 31 days in a month and every single day, a woman may be raped and forced to marry her rapist, one woman explained. Instead of prosecuting criminals, they practically encouraged them to marry their victims and continue the same cruel, inhumane actions.

    And in the same country that had tried to trap them, women stood up.

    They began in blood-and-gauzed gowns, standing outside government buildings in their bandages.

    They armed themselves not with guns, but with signs.

    White won’t cover rape.

    And they drew international attention and sympathy and the power they had been denied their entire lives. Before their campaign, only 1% of the population was even aware of the law.

    But in 2017, the Lebanese government repealed the decades’-old law.

    The women gave them no choice but to listen.

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