How does Wuhan Coronavirus compare with MERS and SARS?

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Mudassir Ali 8 months 1 Answer 102 views

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  1. In 2003, there was another coronavirus pandemic called SARS. Then, as now, experts at the World Health Organization (WHO) predicted a dire wildfire of global cases. Then, as now, a state of emergency was declared. WHO issued an advisory, telling people not to fly into Toronto, because that city was “infected.” When all was said and done, the official number of deaths from SARS? – 800.

    Out of 7 billion people.

    But no matter. The pros are still calling SARS, in retrospect, a serious epidemic. A more proper technical term would be: dud.

    In prior articles in this series, I’ve detailed how the US Centers for Disease Control lied at an astounding level, about case numbers, in the so-called Swine Flu epidemic (2009). The overwhelming percentage of US blood samples sent to labs, from Swine Flu patients, were coming back with no sign of Swine Flu or any other kind of flu. Sharyl Attkisson, a star investigative reporter working for CBS News at the time, exposed this fraud. Yet, the CDC eventually went on to claim that, at the “height of the Swine Flu epidemic,” there were 22 MILLION cases in the US. I kid you not. These experts are big-league liars. They’re champions. They’re in the Hall of Fame.

    If you’re working for a major public health agency, cooking up case numbers and exploiting fear are part of your every-day arsenal. They have to be. Otherwise, “Sorry, folks, that world-ending global pandemic we were telling you about last week? It didn’t pan out. Most of the case are mild, on the order of a bad cold, and a lot of cases we pretty much made up. We got carried away. After all, we’re basic salespeople for the vaccine industry…”

    Remember West Nile, bird flu, Zika, and way back, the Swine Flu scare of 1976? They were all hyped to the sky. They were all predicted to sweep across the world. They were all connected, by some people, to “engineered viruses in biowar labs, against which we don’t stand a chance.” And they were all duds. The case numbers—when the smoke cleared—were miniscule. That’s called a CLUE.

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