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  1. There is as of this month (August 2019). OK, not a 100% cure, but a highly effective new therapy.

    In addition to working on preventive vaccines, scientists have been working on developing antibodies that tie up the Ebola virus. This is sometimes referred to as passive immunization. The first version is called ZMapp (grown in tobacco). Patients can also be treated remdesivir, an antiviral. Either is part of standard of care, along with IV fluid and electrolytes.

    Recently, two engineered anti-Ebola antibodies, REGN-EB3 and mAb-114, were used in a clinical trial, comparing the new treatments with prior therapeutics. The new treatment proved much more effective (as few as 6% of patients died), the trial was stopped and everyone got the new antibodies. Doctors hope that this will encourage people to come in earlier, before they are too far gone. I would also foresee standards of care using combination of antivirals and antibodies. IV fluids will continue as an important part of support.

    Ebola virus have been known to linger in immunologically privileged sites (eyes and reproductive organs), so perhaps “cure” is a bit ambitious as a description.

    But considering that the initial Ebola death rate was 90%, 70% with supportive care and 24% with ZMapp, we are moving in the right direction.

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