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  1. Considering you set a very strict, singular parameter, your dietary limits are fairly non-existent. You can eat just about anything that isn’t bread. I can’t decide if this is a very silly question, or a very nuanced question. I’m sure for most people, the concept of a “no-bread diet” is pretty straightforward, eat whatever you want that isn’t bread.

    Bread being any food composed of wheat flour and was leavened with yeast. That said, are we including unleavened wheat products as well? Because then we have to make sure that we start looking at crackers and matzo, and potentially even pasta.

    You see, the issue here is that you’re trying to make a hard and fast rule. A rule, that by and large, is completely pointless.

    Let’s look at it this way: what do you expect to happen by not eating bread?

    You’re probably looking at the recent low- and no-carb dieting trends and thinking, “If I just remove bread from my diet, then I’ll probably lose a ton of weight?”

    While the logic almost makes sense, it’s largely incredibly flawed. Just because you’re removing the bread, doesn’t mean that anything will happen to your body at all. You might even end up gaining weight and getting fat(ter).

    Look at your diet holistically, instead of zooming on one specific food type. Look at your total quantity of foods eaten, and figure out what you need to do to reduce your total quantity eaten, assuming weight loss is your goal.

    All that said, if you’re interested in a “no-bread diet” for health reasons, such as gluten intolerance/celiac, then you need to look at removing even more than just bread. Remember, though, if you aren’t gluten intolerant or suffering from celiac, then removing bread from your diet won’t have any impact at all.

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