What was The Beatles’ most significant musical mistake?

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Mudassir Ali 9 months 1 Answer 75 views

Answer ( 1 )

  1. There were several mistakes that were made, though who knows what might have happened if not for all that they did wrong.

    For starters, Epstein was an inept negotiator, and the Beatles weren’t paid nearly what they should have been paid. They should have taken charge of ownership of their songs from the very beginning. People have made millions off their talents. The boys…not so much.
    Next, of the Beatles and George Martin, they should have agreed that at least 4 of the 5 would have to approve of any song on an album, or as a single. I know it’s been said that at least all 4 of them would have to give unanimous approval, but that was obviously not the case. All of them (except John) hated Revolution 9, George and John hated Maxwell, When I’m 64, Ob La Di, and Honey Pie, so some slid in there under the radar. Doing this would have eliminated Bungalow Bill, Don’t Pass me By, Good Night, Within You Without you, etc.
    They should have included the singles on their albums as bonus tracks. I know at the time it was considered “cheating” since many would have already purchased the 45s, but not everyone did, and if it’s just a no-cost ‘extra’ on the album, everyone could be happy. Imagine if the Sgt Pepper had consisted of Penny Lane, Hey Bulldog, All You Need is Love, Strawberry Fields, Lucy in the sky, She’s leaving home, Getting Better, Lovely Rita, Isn’t it a pity, Sgt pepper and Sgt Pepper reprise, and A Day in the life. It would be my favorite album. As it is now, I’d rank it 5th, behind Abbey Road, White Album, Rubber Sou and Revolver.
    They should absolutely have eliminated the dreg from the white album and made it a powerful single album, including this playlist: Hey Jude, Julia, Yer Blues, monkey/hide, Sexy Sadie, Happiness is a warm gun, helter skelter, rocky raccoon, blackbird, I’m so tired, martha my dear, While my guitar gently weeps, Dear Prudence, back in the USSR.
    They should never have broken up. They should have agreed to take 10 months off to work on solo projects, and each of them should have come back together the following years, with their most commercial, Beatlesque numbers. They could have done that for another decade, with much better results than any of them could have done apart.

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