What’s the difference between a hijab, niqab and burka?

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What’s the difference between a hijab, niqab and burka?

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WASIMALISHAH 4 weeks 3 Answers 29 views

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  1. niqāb or niqaab (/nɪˈkɑːb/; Arabic: نِقاب‎ niqāb, “[face] veil”), also called a ruband, is a garment of clothing that covers the face, worn by some Muslim women as a part of a particular interpretation of hijab (modest dress). According to the majority of Muslim scholars and Islamic schools of thought, face veiling is a requirement of Islam; however a minority of Muslim scholars assert that women are not required to cover their face in public. Those Muslim women who wear the niqab, do so in places where they may encounter non-mahram (non-related) men.

    The face veil pre-dates Islam, and had been used by certain Arabian pre-Islamic cultures. Culturally, it is “a custom imported from Najd, a region in Saudi Arabia and the power base of its Salafi fundamentalist form of Islam. Within Muslim countries it is very contested and considered fringe.”[1][2]

    Today, the niqab is most often worn in its region of origin: the Arab countries of the Arabian Peninsula — Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates. However, even in these countries, the niqab is neither a universal cultural custom nor is it culturally compulsory. In other parts of the Muslim world outside of the Arabian Peninsula, where the niqab has slowly spread to a much smaller extent, it is regarded warily by Sunni and non-Sunni Muslims alike “as a symbol of encroaching fundamentalism.”[3] Nevertheless, the niqab is worn by a small minority of Muslims in not only Muslim-majority regions such as Somalia, Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, the Palestinian territories, and Southern Iran, but also among a minority of Muslims in regions where Muslims are themselves a minority, like India and Europe.

    The terms niqab and burqa are often conflated; a niqab covers the face while leaving the eyes uncovered, while a burqa covers the entire body from the top of the head to the ground, with only a mesh screen allowing the wearer to see in front of her.

  2. The word hijab refers to both the head-covering traditionally worn by some Muslim women and Islamic styles of dress in general.

    The garment has different legal and cultural status in various countries. In the Indonesian Aceh province, Muslim women are required to wear the hijab[1] and all women are required to do so in Iran.[2]

    France has banned overt religious symbols, including many religious headcoverings, in public schools and universities or government buildings.[3] Kosovo (since 2009),[4] Azerbaijan (since 2010[5]), Tunisia (since 1981,[6] partially lifted in 2011) and Turkey (gradually lifted)[7][8] are the only Muslim-majority countries which have banned the hijab in public schools and universities or government buildings, while Syria banned face veils in universities from July 2010.[9] In other Muslim states such as Morocco,[10] there have been complaints of restriction or discrimination against women who wear the hijab. The hijab in these cases is seen as a sign of political Islam or fundamentalism against secular government.[citation needed]

    Islamic dress, notably the variety of headdresses worn by Muslim women, has become a prominent symbol of the presence of Islam in western Europe. In several countries, this adherence to hijab has led to political controversies and proposals for a legal ban. Laws have been passed in France and Belgium to ban face-covering clothing, popularly described as the “burqa ban”, although it does not only apply to the Afghan-model burqa.

    Other countries are debating similar legislation, or have more limited prohibitions. Some of them apply only to face-covering clothing such as the burqaboushiya, or niqāb, while other legislation pertains to any clothing with an Islamic religious symbolism such as the khimar, a type of headscarf. Some countries already have laws banning the wearing of masks in public, which can be applied to veils that conceal the face. The issue has different names in different countries, and “the veil” or hijab may be used as general terms for the debate, representing more than just the veil itself, or the concept of modesty embodied in hijab.

    Although the Balkans and Eastern Europe have Muslim populations, most Muslims in western Europe are members of immigrant communities. The issue of Islamic dress is linked with issues of immigration and the position of Islam in Western Europe.

    There are currently 16 nations that have banned the burqa (not to be confused with the hijab), including Tunisia,[11] Austria, Denmark, France, Belgium, Tajikistan, Latvia,[12] Bulgaria,[13] Cameroon, Chad, Congo-Brazzaville, Gabon, Netherlands,[14] China,[15] Morocco and Sri Lanka.[16]

  3. Composite image of Muslim women wearing headscarvesAFP/GETTY/REUTERS

    Hijab, niqab, burka – there are lots of different kinds of coverings worn by Muslim women all over the world.
    Some women wear a headscarf to cover their head and hair, while others wear a burka or niqab, which also covers up their face.
    Headscarves are seen as a sign of modesty by people who wear them, and a symbol of religious faith, but not everyone agrees with them and in some countries, like France and Denmark, there’s a ban on wearing garments that cover the face in public.
    Here’s our guide to the various different types of headscarves:

    Woman wearing a Hijab

    The word hijab describes the act of covering up generally but is often used to describe the headscarves worn by Muslim women. These scarves come in many styles and colours. The type most commonly worn in the West covers the head and neck but leaves the face clear.

    Woman wearing a Niqab

    The niqab is a veil for the face that leaves the area around the eyes clear. However, it may be worn with a separate eye veil. It is worn with an accompanying headscarf.

    Woman wearing a Burka

    The burka is the most concealing of all Islamic veils. It is a one-piece veil that covers the face and body, often leaving just a mesh screen to see through.

    Woman wearing an Al-Amira

    The al-amira is a two-piece veil. It consists of a close fitting cap, usually made from cotton or polyester, and a tube-like scarf.

    Woman wearing a Shayla

    The shayla is a long, rectangular scarf popular in the Gulf region. It is wrapped around the head and tucked or pinned in place at the shoulders.

    Woman wearing a Khimar

    The khimar is a long, cape-like veil that hangs down to just above the waist. It covers the hair, neck and shoulders completely, but leaves the face clear.

    Woman wearing a Chador

    The chador, worn by many Iranian women when outside the house, is a full-body cloak. It is often accompanied by a smaller headscarf underneath.

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