When a soldier is wounded, does he cry/shout/scream?

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Mudassir Ali 8 months 1 Answer 91 views

Answer ( 1 )

  1. Most soldiers don’t scream after they got hit by a bullet or a piece of shrapnel. After the initial shock of being hit, it takes a few moments before the first signs of pain can be felt.

    After this has happened, however, many soldiers are fighting not to scream:

    My platoon leader in Bosnia had gotten several inches of metal shrapnel through his right foot. He had sat on a tank when it had driven over an anti tank mine. I immediately ran to help him and saw the big chunk of metal protruding out of his army boot.

    He asked us for a morphine injection, but none of us had any. Then, after a minute, we could see how the pain kicked in. This guy was a tough nail, a former French Foreign Legion paratrooper, and he bravely fought what must have been an excruciating and agonizing pain.

    Tears shot out of his eyes and he started to swear a lot, but he didn’t shout or scream, though. After five minutes, a medic arrived and he finally got his injection. His pain was so intense that they had to give him another shot, just a few minutes after the first one.

    Soldiers who got hit by bullets usually don’t have that much pain. I got myself hit by a machine gun bullet and the pain was manageable. Of course, when you get hit in your genitals or other sensitive areas, you’ll probably scream your lungs out.

    I saw soldiers who had sustained life threatening injuries, but none of them uttered more than a few sounds. However, they often complained that they felt very cold and we had to cover them in blankets, although it was summer and the temperatures were very high.

    Soldiers clench their teeth together after they got wounded, they curse a lot and may shed some tears, but most of them don’t cry. A combat medic is usually nearby and will give them a shot, before the pain becomes too much for them to handle.

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