Why isn’t China a democratic country?

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Mudassir Ali 3 months 4 Answers 107 views 0

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  1. China is a Meritocracy, yes it has elements of Democracy in it and also has elements of a benevolent Dictatorship as well, but of course only the elements which works and it works very well, that means it doesn’t fall into any narrow interpretation as either “democratic” or “authoritarian”.

    There is another “China” its called Taiwan, it’s what you would call a Democracy now and it is a mess and all its current success? Achieved under a benevolent Dictator prior.

    The reason why China isn’t a democratic country is pretty simple, it is because it has a political system (Majorly based on Merit) that is far superior, it doesn’t need to change to something inferior because that would be taking a step backwards.

  2. Originally Answered: Why can China not be called a democratic country?
    -Because China is a communist country lead by a bureaucracy which is not elected by the majority of people

    -Because unlike in western countries things as simple as freedom of speech, religion, press, and such is not allowed or at least severely inhibited

    -Becuase the Internet is heavily policed, blocked, and people’s views can be stifled

    -Because Chinese media domintated, and there are few independent media outlets of journalists! People hate NBC, Fox and CNN but their journalists aren’t silenced, jailed or threatened

    -Because there isn’t a seperation between China’s Executive and Judicial Branch; Communist officials make justice and there is no indepentant organ to mediate disputes between private citizens and interested state partners

    -Because Gays, Transgenders, minorities, women an other vulnerable groups don’t have NEARLY as much power or right or protection as these groups in America or Western Countries!

    -Because so many Chinese flee abroad and don’t come back versus people in democratic nations who obviously prefer freedom, accountability and such…

    And on and on and on….

    Or this, the fact China’s population has to often self Center themselves, agree with the government, take Chinese media ‘s word for granted or just play by rules because they know the consequences are brutal if they don’t. In a democracy you can mock the leaders, have harsh media articles, criticize policy or media and not get into major trouble. In China you can suffer harsh consequences.

  3. Oddly enough China is one of the very few where the government is actually popular, where more than 50% of the populations say they think the government is OK (from Pew Research). Even Angela Merkel no longer gets that level of support.

    This suggests that it is one of the few democratic governments in the world, unless you perversly believe that some selected by less than 10% and voted for by 26% in a choice of two where his unpopular opponent got more votes, like Donald Trump, is somehow more democratic. But only someone blind to western self-righteousness could think that.

  4. Originally Answered: Why is China not considered a democratic republic?
    Mostly because it isn’t, but that’s totally a matter of perception and a definition of “democratic” that varies from situation to situation.

    To generally be considered as democratic, a country should, to an outside observer, have free and fair decisions where all citizens are allowed to vote in an election for people that govern them. The election should generally be open to contestation (ie, multiple parties can contest the election) and there should occasionally be a change in the party or people in power.

    China does not have universal sufferage electing either its parliament (the National Peoples’ Congress) is elected by representatives of provincial assemblies, who themselves are elected by lower level assemblies. China also restricts the number of candidates for seats in elections.

    The only parts of China that resemble a substantial democracy are the elections in local villages where there is no limit on candidates, though you’re not likely to see approved candidates who differ widely from those in power.

    That being said, the definition of “democracy” is one that is entirely subjective, though there are external measures that can be applied to it.

    The question of republic is also subjective, as you will find people who will suggested that Xi Jingping cannot be the head of a republic because his personal powers put him closer to a monarch. This may be the case, but China’s system has no royal family nor king, so despite the fact that it may be controlled by a small number of people (ie, one) it may not be objectively considered anything other than a republic

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